Make-up, Beauty, and Raising a Little Girl

(A little while ago, an old friend of mine approached me to see if I wanted to try the mascara she sells – Younique 3D fibre lashes. I was hesitant, but she’s a friend, and I want to support her, so I said sure, I’d give it a go. And guys? It’s amazing. I love it. But it also got me thinking about make-up and beauty and consumerism and so then this post happened. Because I want to support my friend, and also because I love the product, this post contains affiliate links and I get a bit of a kick-back if you decide to purchase anything after you read it. But, this post is not going to try to sell you anything, I promise, so I hope you think it’s worth reading anyway.)

Make-up and I have a difficult history. I’ve never had much time for it. Even in my high school years, when all the other typical teenagers were playing around with eye shadow and mascara, I couldn’t see the point in spending hours in the bathroom, leaning in close to the mirror to smudge colour over my face. Even as I grew up and entered a world in which “looking put together” often involves make-up, I couldn’t bring myself to lose precious moments of sleep to fuss over my appearance. And money – make-up can be so expensive.

Appearances can be so expensive.

Because I never spent much time or money on it, I never became particularly adept with make-up. I figured out a simple routine early on that works, for the most part, for my face, and over the years, I’ve adjusted the products I use a bit here and there. I wear make-up almost every day now, and some days, depending on the company I keep, the things I read, the issues I think about, I wish I had spent more time in my younger years playing around and making mistakes with the powders, colours, and creams that are so often associated with beauty and femininity.

I believe I am beautiful without make-up. I believe my skin, even with blemishes, looks just fine, even when it’s uncovered by foundation and concealer. I believe my eyelashes are long enough, dark enough, enhance my eye colour enough. I believe my lips are fine. I believe my cheeks don’t need to pop with a contour of bronzer and blush. However, I also believe that make-up can be fun, that making myself look different – not better, different – with a flip of colour and a darkened eye can help me hit the reset button on a bad week, or adjust my view on the world just a touch in order to see something new around me.

I sometimes think about what I want to teach my daughter about make-up. What does she think when she sees me flick lengthening mascara onto my eyelashes? Does she think I’m trying to cover my true self when I brush bronzer over my cheeks? How can I teach her to love the skin she’s in, the face she has, in a world that so highly values a painted one? How do I share an enjoyment of make-up while also instilling a strong self-confidence in herself without it?

I’m not sure how to do it yet. Like so much of my experience with motherhood, we’re moving forward blindly, doing our best and hoping she hears the right things from me, the things she’ll need as she grows. In the end, this is all I can do, right?

(My make-up routine:

Feel free to shop my “party” by clicking the link above. And let me know what you think. About anything. Younique. Make-up in general. Raising little girls. Self esteem. Anything.)

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