Thursday, October 4, 2012

Three Things for Thursday

Fall

One: Boots


I wish. I have a $100 Fairview-Cadillac gift card I've been carrying around with me for the past few months. Recently, I've determined what I want to spend it on. 

Boots.

I repeat: I wish. 


A couple days ago, while killing some time before meeting up with the Husband downtown after work, I poked through Aldo and Spring with high hopes for that gift card. Turns out... boots are expensive! My $100 was useless. I couldn't justify them considering these boots would not be my every day footwear. Skinnies and skirts - I've got one pair of skinnies and two dozen skirts I almost never wear.

Two: Farmers' Markets


Last Saturday, I took my shopping bags on a 15 minute walk south to the Withrow Park Farmers' Market.


I learned something about myself. Something I probably knew before, but something that I maybe had to relearn.

I'm intimidated by farmers' markets.

I know, that sounds ridiculous. But, as I walked among the booths, it quickly became clear to me that the majority of the other shoppers did this every week. They knew the vendors. Could chat freely and easily with them about recipes and food and growing seasons and fall. Me? I didn't even know for certain which types of squash they were selling. Each interaction felt awkward, forced, and, well, expensive. 'Cause that's the other thing: it felt like there was this unspoken rule floating from booth to booth that said I wasn't supposed to care about the cost of the wares. Price didn't matter - you want carrots? You buy carrots and the only reason to ask how much is so that you can count through your coins, then, gleefully pull out your last $20 instead because you don't have enough.

Am I the only one who thinks this model is over-rated and unsustainable? Am I the only one who will admit to appreciating the prices of the mass-produced, even genetically-modified-for-higher-yields produce found in grocery stores? The only one who wonders that we maybe haven't yet found an appropriate model for sustainability yet?

Three: Thanksgiving


Here's a request for my fellow Canadian bloggers: stop calling Thanksgiving 'Canadian Thanksgiving'. Our American counterparts don't call their Thanksgiving 'American Thanksgiving'. There is no reason for us to add the descriptor. Is our Thanksgiving less of a Thanksgiving than theirs? We celebrate ours in October; they celebrate theirs in November. But they're all Thanksgiving. Just Thanksgiving. 

This time last year. We had duck and carrot soup for Thanksgiving dinner.

Oh dear. This post became very ranty. I'm sorry! Probably, I need a break. Probably, I need the sun to start rising before I do again. Probably, I need to up my vitamin intake.

I certainly need to rename this post "Three Things That Get My Goat for Thursday."

16 comments:

  1. Eek! Sorry you had a less than great experience at the Farmer's market :( the ones we have locally are generally inexpensive or on par with what is available commercially at the grocery store (for mass produced, GMO-non organics) with the bonus of it being all organic & all homemade goods. Kind of boggles my mind that the noe[s] in TO would be so expensive.

    Boots make me sad. They're pretty and perfect for the short fall season and I love them, but like you have a really hard time justifying the cost (especially since I don't work in an office or anything where I have to dress well/up). Maybe keep your eye out over the off seasons to see if you can find a deal on something you really like & buy it ahead of time before the seasonal boot-rush inflates the prices?

    As for the "Canadian Thanksgiving" thing, I think most Canadian bloggers add the descriptor because such a huuuuuge percentage of the audience they are reaching are American. But I agree, I really don't think it's necessary. Turkey is turkey. Doesn't matter when you eat it.

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  2. So it is just the 'heart-of-the-city' farmers' markets? Some of it was well priced (the squash was only $2 each - I haven't looked in the grocery store recently, but I would say that's about right) other bits seemed way too hefty.

    I'm hoping that mid-November or so, sales will start and I'll be able to pick up a pair for less than $100. We'll see. I don't have my hopes up.

    The Thanksgiving thing is really just a silly pet peeve of mine. I guess I just don't really like the fact that Canadian bloggers feel like they have to cater to their American readers, especially when I would be very surprised if said American readers even care. But yeah... silly pet peeve. :)

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  3. Happy Canadian Thanksgiving Jeanette!!! ;) hehehe

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  4. Oh, you! ;)

    (And now, I'm totally laughing at myself. Thanks!)

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  5. Farmers' Markets:

    a) You'll get better at it once you go a few times. It doesn't take that much to start to know your favourite vendors.

    b) Ask about prices. In fact, if they don't prominently display their prices, go to a different vendor.

    c) It helps to comparison shop the grocery store a little. I also find that the farmer's market tends to be a little more expensive and so I usually only buy things that are not often found in grocery stores. I generally skip the organic vendors altogether. Local and in-season (and a little cheaper) is good enough for me.

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  6. a) I'm sure this is true! And perhaps I'll give it another chance, just for this reason.

    b) No one had prices displayed! No one! Except the meat guy. And the folks who were selling pre-cut, pre-packaged, single-serving bags of lettuce and greens for $7 a piece.

    c) Perhaps the problem is the one I went to? I'm pretty sure they were all organic vendors. I suppose I may have better luck if I go to the bigger one at Nathan Phillips Square.

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  7. Those boots are looking goooood. I'm in the market for new boots too. Try this place, if you can get there: Dixie Outlet Mall in Mississauga. You probably can't use your gift card, but Naturalizer has pricey boots on the cheap and it's my go to spot every year!
    Happy Thanksgiving to you...(and trust me in my post coming out soon I wasn't dreaming of calling it Canadian Thanksgiving - never heard of such a thing!)

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  8. I too find farmers markets intimidating - I went to the massive one in St. Jacobs a few weeks ago, and all I did was wonder around a gape at all the people, all the veggies and fruits, and also at some of the prices. I didn't buy a thing - maybe next time.
    I don't call it Canadian Thanksgiving - it's just Thanksgiving. If I lived in the states however I'd probably celebrate both 'American' and' 'Canadian' Thanksgivings - any excuse to eat turkey and pumpkin pie! Yummy!

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  9. Go for the boots (or a less expensive but equally nice pair of boots elsewhere)! You'll likely find that in wanting to wear the boots, you will wear your skirts, dresses, and skinny jeans more often (or at least that's how it went for me).

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  10. Noted! Yes, I probably can't use my gift card - I can only use it at the Eaton's Centre and Fairview Mall - but if I can find good boots inexpensively priced elsewhere, I might be willing to spend my gift card on other things.

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  11. Yes! I know a number of Canadians who live in the states (my brother, for one!). I know a bunch of them get together with all the other Canadians and celebrate Canadian Thanksgiving, then American Thanksgiving as normal with everyone else a month later. In that situation, the qualifiers are totally acceptable!

    St. Jacobs is especially intimidating because you can hardly even get up to the stands to see the fruit because of all the masses of people. Perhaps we both need to give a different one a chance... maybe the one at Nathan Phillips Square?

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  12. Oh, I'm sure this is true! And, in reality, if I use my $100 gift card, my boots become $13 boots. So, eventually, I may allow myself a justification. For now, I'm kind of hoping they'll come down in price around the end of October, when there's still plenty of cool weather in which to wear them!

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  13. Oh, I'm sure this is true! And, in reality, if I use my $100 gift card, my boots become $13 boots. So, eventually, I may allow myself a justification. For now, I'm kind of hoping they'll come down in price around the end of October, when there's still plenty of cool weather in which to wear them!

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  14. Yes! I know a number of Canadians who live in the states (my brother, for one!). I know a bunch of them get together with all the other Canadians and celebrate Canadian Thanksgiving, then American Thanksgiving as normal with everyone else a month later. In that situation, the qualifiers are totally acceptable!

    St. Jacobs is especially intimidating because you can hardly even get up to the stands to see the fruit because of all the masses of people. Perhaps we both need to give a different one a chance... maybe the one at Nathan Phillips Square?

    ReplyDelete
  15. Noted! Yes, I probably can't use my gift card - I can only use it at the Eaton's Centre and Fairview Mall - but if I can find good boots inexpensively priced elsewhere, I might be willing to spend my gift card on other things.

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  16. Go for the boots (or a less expensive but equally nice pair of boots elsewhere)! You'll likely find that in wanting to wear the boots, you will wear your skirts, dresses, and skinny jeans more often (or at least that's how it went for me).

    ReplyDelete